Details

ISBN-10: 0872868850
ISBN-13: 9780872868854
Publisher: City Lights Books
Publish Date: 08/16/2022
Dimensions: 0.00" L, 0.00" W, 0.00" H

Published by City Lights

Twenty Dollars and Change: Harriet Tubman vs. Andrew Jackson, and the Future of American Democracy

Price: $21.95 $15.37

Overview

America is in the throes of a historic reckoning with racism, and official narratives are up for revision as we struggle to bring our democracy forward. Re-evaluating who should be honored as a national hero is a key front in the fight for racial justice. Whose lives and contributions should be officially celebrated in our […]

America is in the throes of a historic reckoning with racism, and official narratives are up for revision as we struggle to bring our democracy forward.

Re-evaluating who should be honored as a national hero is a key front in the fight for racial justice. Whose lives and contributions should be officially celebrated in our monuments, statues, street names, and the portraits on the money we exchange with one another every day?

For some, it’s Andrew Jackson–a slaveholder who led military campaigns against Native Americans to expand US territory–who deserves to appear on the front of our most commonly used paper currency, the twenty-dollar bill. For others, it’s Harriet Tubman–the abolitionist and Civil War veteran who repeatedly risked her life to free others from slavery–who better deserves the spot as an example of what America is and can be.

The debate over the future of the twenty-dollar bill exemplifies the country’s struggle to come to terms with historic realities of white supremacy and abolitionism, and the ways in which those legacies are still active and influential today. Jackson represents a flawed political vision rooted in racial and economic domination, while Harriet Tubman’s life story represents the struggle for liberation and justice for all–demands that protest movements have advanced with renewed urgency since the murder of George Floyd and the social inequities highlighted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

In Twenty Dollars and Change, African American scholar Clarence Lusane takes stock of the millions of Americans who have mobilized for and against honoring Tubman by enshrining her image on money, and places that debate within the ongoing struggle to realize a democracy in which her emancipatory, inclusive vision prevails.

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Reviews

"Lusane is an elegant, impassioned writer." –The Observer

PRAISE FOR CLARENCE LUSANE'S THE BLACK HISTORY OF THE WHITE HOUSE

"For many Americans, the White House stands as a symbol of liberty and justice. But its gleaming facade hides harsh realities, from the slaves who built the home to the presidents who lived there and shaped the country's racial history, often for the worse. In The Black History of the White House, Clarence Lusane traces the path of race relations in America by telling a very specific history–the stories of those African-Americans who built, worked at and visited the White House."–Mary Louise Kelly, Talk of the Nation, National Public Radio

"Those who think they know their presidents may be in for surprises in Clarence Lusane's fascinating social history that begins: 'More than one in four U.S. presidents were involved in human trafficking and slavery. These presidents bought, sold, bred and enslaved black people for profit. Of the 12 presidents who were enslavers, more than half kept people in bondage at the White House.' Lusane weaves in stories of people like Paul Jennings, born into slavery on James Madison's farm, who at 10 was a White House footman and in 1865 wrote the first White House memoir, A Colored Man's Reminiscences of James Madison."–USA Today

"While the nation was born under the banner of 'freedom and justice for all, ' many colonists risked rebelling against England in order to protect their lucrative slave business from the growing threat of British abolitionism. The Black History of the White House by Clarence Lusane presents a comprehensive–yet untold–history of the White House from an African American perspective. In illuminating the central role Blacks played in this country's history, Lusane charts the course of race relations in the United States."–The Philadelphia Tribune

"Lusane returns to the nation's highest office in his latest work, tracing the seldom-revealed contributions of black men and women in the White House, from the days of its construction to the present. Whether considering slave-owning presidents who publicly skirted their participation in the practice, exploring Emancipation, Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement and its aftermath, or discussing contemporary instances, like the Beer Summit, and questioning whether the Obama presidency signals a post-racial era, Lusane offers a vital addition to American history. Lusane's effort is much more than a catchy title or revisionist tome: it's an eye-opening tribute and a provocative reminder of the many narratives that have gone untold."Publishers Weekly

"The Obamas were the first African American first family, but not the first residents. This thoroughly researched and gripping book shares the untold stories of some of the people who were enslaved by U.S. presidents, including stories of resistance and escape. Lusane describes the myriad ways that the White House and the lives of African Americans have been intertwined throughout U.S. history. This is the only book to document this essential story in our country's history."–Rethinking Schools

"Barack Obama may be the first black president in the White House, but he's far from the first black person to work in it. In this fascinating history of all the enslaved people, workers, and entertainers who spent time in the president's official residence over the years, Clarence Lusane restores the White House to its true colors."–Barbara Ehrenreich

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Details

ISBN-10: 0872868850
ISBN-13: 9780872868854
Publisher: City Lights Books
Publish Date: 08/16/2022
Dimensions: 0.00" L, 0.00" W, 0.00" H
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